The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission will do what it can to ensure the Food and Grocery Code of Conduct succeeds, chairman Rod Sims said this week at an industry forum hosted by the Australian Food and Grocery Council (AFGC) in Canberra.

“We are confident the Code can succeed in achieving its objectives. It can redress the imbalance in bargaining power that often exists between suppliers and larger grocery retailers by prohibiting certain types of unfair conduct, and by requiring retailers to deal with suppliers in good faith at all times,” Mr Sims said.

Mr Sims welcomed the approach of the AFGC which has put more than 1000 people from over 80 companies through training sessions on the Code.  However, Mr Sims said that the major retailers haven’t got off to a great start in presenting new supply agreements.

“We have written to these retailers expressing our concerns. This action, which we made public, as some suppliers urged us to do, was not a signal that the Code faces great difficulties; it was, instead, a signal that we will do what we can to ensure the Code succeeds,” Mr Sims added.

“Ensuring suppliers are aware of their rights is crucial to the success of the Code. Our public action was designed to help with this.”

In addressing emerging issues in the food and grocery sector, Mr Sims discussed proposed changes to the country of origin labelling regime and the role of regulators.

“The proposed new system represents major change; it would reshape the obligations of traders, requiring most food to display the percentage of local content in addition to stating a country of origin.”

Mr Sims also discussed the ACCC’s approach to protecting consumers, competition and innovation by ensuring truth in advertising.

“We have been very busy in the food sector, focusing on the powerful promotional claims that go to the premium nature of a product or a particular production process,” he said.

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