An alliance of industry associations are concerned over the high costs and threat to jobs of a New South Wales drinks container deposit scheme (CDS) that could impact on drink sales through convenience stores.
The government invited industry players to participate in discussions over the introduction of a CDS.

However, it is not known if this will follow the 10 cent container deposit schemes used in South Australia and the Northern Territory.

And Coca-Cola Amatil confirmed that the NSW Government has obtained independent advice which states that a container deposit legislation (CDL) scheme using reverse vending machines and targeting containers consumed away from home will be more effective in reducing litter and increasing recycling.

“CCA is committed to working collaboratively, co-operatively and in good faith with the NSW Government,” CCA said.

The industry alliance’s spokesperson, Gary Dawson, CEO of the Australian Food and Grocery Council, said industry remained committed to working with the NSW Government to develop the most effective and efficient way to reduce litter and improve recycling.

“Industry has extensive experience in this area across many markets globally and across many different regimes.” Mr Dawson said.

“This experience in conjunction with the findings of the COAG Report made public in December 2014 should prove invaluable to the Governments decision making process.”

Mr Dawson added that the COAG Report was based on four years of exhaustive analysis of the costs and benefits of policy options including CDL and is regarded as the most independent and reliable advice on this matter available.

“Industry continues to stand behind its scheme which not only meets the NSW Government’s environmental targets at a lower cost than a CDS, but also ensures that consumers are not unnecessarily penalised and jobs are not unnecessarily put at risk,” he said.

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